Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Answers to the most frequently asked questions about the IBP programme are listed below. If you have general questions, please see Leiden FAQ

Application and admission

  1. When do I need to apply?
  2. Does my diploma meet the requirements for the International Bachelor in Psychology (IBP)?
  3. I am a native speaker of the English language or have been educated in an English-speaking country. Do I need to hand in standardised test scores?
  4. Why do I have to apply through two systems?
  5. If I am admitted, when would I need to come to Leiden?

Matching

  1. What is matching?
  2. How do I register for compulsory matching?
  3. I want to study Psychology, but I am not certain at which university. What should I do?
  4. What happens if I cannot participate in matching?
  5. What is the difference between Experience Day, Student for a Day and Matching?
  6. What happens if I find out during matching that this programme is not a good fit for me?
  7. Where can I find the rules for matching?
  8. When is my registration complete?
  9. Do I need to pay a fee for matching?

Programme and general

  1. What are the dates of the academic year at Leiden University?
  2. Is it possible to start the programme in January?
  3. Can I do the programme on a part-time basis?
  4. Are transfer credits accepted into the programme?
  5. What are the courses offered in the first year?
  6. Do I have to specialise early?
  7. Can I study abroad during the programme?
  8. What is the degree I will receive upon completion?
  9. I have a learning disability. Will I get more time to take my examinations?
  10. Does the University offer support on issues other than academic ones?
  11. How many hours a week will I need to devote to my study? And what testing methods are used?
  12. Will I need to learn Dutch to study at Leiden University?
  13. Does Leiden University offer Master’s programmes?
  14. Can I be accepted in to a graduate programme outside of The Netherlands with this degree?
  15. Is a bachelor’s degree from Leiden University recognised outside The Netherlands?
  16. What are my chances of finding work as a psychologist?

1. When do I need to apply?

We encourage all international applicants to apply early so that they can take part in the early bird matching module. This means that all required documents must have been submitted to Application Online and Studielink by January 15, 2017. See How to apply

2. Does my diploma meet the requirements for the International Bachelor in Psychology (IBP)?

Your level of education should be comparable to the Dutch VWO (pre-university/high-school) level, and include mathematics at final exam level.
To see if your diploma is equivalent to the Dutch VWO diploma, Check this list of foreign national diplomas If your diploma is not on this list, you may still be admissible. Your diploma will be evaluated by the Admissions Office after you have submitted your online application.

2.a: Does my IB diploma meet the requirements for IBP?
Your IB diploma meets the admission criteria

2.b: Does my IB level of mathematics meet the requirements for IBP?
All IB levels of mathematics (Math Studies, Math Standard and Math Higher level) meet the admission criteria. There are 5 required statistics courses in the programme so students need to be mathematically oriented. Part of the compulsory matching module will be focused on statistics to give you an idea about the competency required.

2.c: I have 3 A-levels, should one be in mathematics?
If you obtain at least 3 academic A-levels (grades A-C, see list of international diplomas) you are admissible and can be considered for selection, even if you do not have an A-level in mathematics. Generally speaking a GCSE in mathematics is not regarded as pre-university level, so you should preferably have an AS in mathematics if you do not have an A-level. Please note that most BTEC A-levels are not regarded as academic A-levels. By academic we mean science-related, for example maths, biology, geography, etc. Design, photography, art, etc. are not regarded as academic A-levels. Make sure you upload information on your level of mathematics into the Application Online system. Part of the compulsory matching module will be focused on statistics to give you an idea about the competency required.
For other diplomas, the general rule is that you should have taken final exams in mathematics or have mathematics at the University preparatory level. The Admissions Office will assess your level. Please upload information on your level of mathematics into the Online Application System.

2.d: Should my diploma be translated?
If your original diploma is not in Dutch, English, French or German you need to get an official translation (certified) and upload that into the Application Online system.

2.e. Should I be worried about statistics and biology?
We do not expect you to have much prior knowledge about statistics, other than what you have done during your maths programme at secondary school. Both in the statistics and the neuropsychology courses we will start at the beginning. However, the speed with which the material is dealt with is higher than at secondary school. People who have some prior knowledge in statistics and/or biology have an advantage of a couple of weeks, but for them too, a lot of the material is new.

3. Who needs to take the English proficiency test? What standardised test scores do I need? Are native English speakers or students educated in English exempt?

For exemptions see our Entry Requirements

3.a: When should I do my English proficiency test?
We encourage all applicants to apply early so that they can take part in the early bird matching module. To be eligible to take part in early bird match you must complete your application file by January 15. However it is possible to submit the results of your English language proficiency test after January 15 and still take part in the early bird matching. Please note the process of getting your results can take a very long time! The proficiency test scores must not be older than 2 years at the time of the application deadline.

4. Why do I have to apply through two systems?

Application Online is the system Leiden University uses for international applications. If you are applying with a dutch VWO diploma you do not need to apply in Application on-line. Studielink is the Dutch national system that incorporates all people studying in the Netherlands. All students have to be registered in Studielink as well because that’s what drives our other internal systems. Apply in Application Online first, and immediately after in Studielink.

4.a. I get stuck in Studielink, what should I do?
You can apply in Studielink as of October 1st. See Studielink Help 2017.
If you have an IB diploma, you do not need to send in additional proof of English proficiency, even though Studielink tells you that the institution requires that you partake in a language assessment (as an IB or a native speaker, you are exempted from that).

4.b. I get messages and letters from the DUO. What should I do?
DUO (Dienst Uitvoering Onderwijs) is responsible for the execution of several acts and regulations, such as student grants and information management. DUO verifies whether the school – and study data the student has provided are similar to the way the student is registered at the institution of education. You need to respond to whatever DUO asks you to do (send in the ‘late submission response card” if you will get your final exam results/diploma after the DUO deadline, etc) because they need to register you in the correct way, and it drives our monitoring system once you are a student here. Exactly what DUO needs from you depends on the type of secondary education you attended. For some types of diplomas, DUO needs to receive certified copies, and for others, DUO needs a so-called “Beschikking” from our Admissions Office. Make sure you know if your type of diploma requires that you send a certified copy to both Leiden University Admissions Office AND DUO, or only to the Admissions Office and they will send a so-called “Beschikking” to DUO. Carefully check the Limited quota programmes – Submission of academic records

DUO home page
Make sure you study the requirements and follow up on whatever DUO asks you to do. Check your email (junk/spam mail box included) as well as printed communication sent by post to the address you have provided:
DUO home page for international visitors

Please note: you should always act according to the requests DUO sends you. What we put on our University websites does not replace DUO information, it just informs you in more detail about some of the points that you may have problems with.

5. If I am admitted, when would I need to come to Leiden?

Classes typically start on the first Monday of September and run until the end of June or early July. We strongly advise you to participate in one of Leiden University introduction weeks, the El Cid or OWL which take place in mid to late August.

MATCHING

6. What is matching?

The International Bachelor in Psychology programme of Leiden University finds it very important that you carefully choose your study programme. By participating in the matching module after you are deemed admissible, you get a realistic idea of what the programme is about. Students who put time and effort into their choice of study programme are more likely to have success in the first year of the programme.

7. How do I register for compulsory matching?

After you have registered in Studielink, you will be informed about matching. The Institute of Psychology will send you an email message approximately 2 weeks before the start of the matching period.

8. I want to study Psychology, but I am not certain at which university. What should I do?

If you are in doubt about in which university to enrol, we strongly advise you to research these different universities and participate in Open Day or Experience Day activities. Enrol at the university which best suits you and participate in matching to get a good impression of the programme.

9. What happens if I cannot participate in matching?

You can participate in matching or in February or in June, dependent upon the date you submitted your application. You only can participate once. If, because of unavoidable circumstances , you are unable to participate in matching, you can apply for an official exemption. Participation in the matching module will take place online, so you can decide when to plan the hours required to complete the module. If you do not participate in the module, or if you do not complete the module, your request for registration will be declined and you will be unable to start with the Psychology programme.

10. What is the difference between Experience Day, Student for a Day and Matching?

During our Open Day you discover the different programmes Leiden University has to offer. The Open Day is for exploration. If you have already decided the field of study you are interested in, you can further explore our faculties and study programmes during the Experience Day or Student for a Day. Once you have made up your mind and decided to study Psychology, you should register for the programme and participate in compulsory matching.

11. What happens if I find out during matching that this programme is not a good fit for me?

If you find out that the Psychology programme is not a good match for you, you should make another (study) choice and deregister for the IBP programme in Studielink to confirm your withdrawal.

12. Where can I find the rules for matching?

The rules and regulations that cover matching are part of the University Regulation on Student Registration and Tuition fees. This document will soon be published on (expected in February 2017)

13. When is my registration complete?

All steps you need to follow:
Dutch VWO Student:
• You apply in Studielink, but no later than 1 May.
• You have participated and fully completed the matching module.
• You are admissible to the programme.
• You have paid your tuition fees.

All other applicants:
• You apply in Studielink, but no later than 1 May.
• You apply in Application Online, no later than 1 May. (1 April if you need a visa, residence permit). And you are deemed (conditionally) admissible.
• You have participated and fully completed the matching module.
• You are admissible to the programme.
• You have paid your tuition fees.

14. Do I need to pay a fee for matching?

There is no charge for participation in matching.

PROGRAMME AND GENERAL

15. What are the dates of the academic year at Leiden University?

The academic year runs from the beginning of September until late June / mid July depending upon whether or not re-sits of exams are required. For a general idea of dates of semesters, public holidays, etc. see the academic calendar 2017-2018

16. Is it possible to start the programme in January?

It is only possible to start the IBP programme at the beginning of the academic year, in September.

17. Can I do the programme on a part-time basis?

No, part time study is not an option as the IBP is a full-time programme. A student should be willing and able to spend 40 hours a week on his/her study. Courses will be planned through out the week.

18. Are transfer credits accepted into the programme?

If you have completed a University level education it may be possible to request a limited number of exemptions. This will be decided on a case-by-case basis.

19. What are the courses offered in the first year?

For an overview of the 12 courses, please see Your first year

20. Do I have to specialise early?

During the second part of the second year and the entire third year you will have more freedom in how you put your programme together. You can choose to concentrate on a particular subdiscipline and specialise, or you can choose courses from various subdisciplines to further orient yourself in the field. There is also room to take electives.

21. Can I study abroad during the programme?

With careful planning and good grades it is possible to study Psychology abroad for a semester during the third year.

22. What is the degree I will receive upon completion?

The degree is a Bachelor of Science degree and the diploma will read Bachelor in Psychology.

23. I have a learning disability. Will I get more time to take my examinations?

Yes. Students will a documented learning disability are given more time to complete examinations. For details, accepted students should contact the Fenestra Learning Disabilty

24. Does the University offer support on issues other than academic ones?

Yes, we have Advisers, Counsellors and Psychologists who can help you with legal and financial issues, administrative problems, socio-emotional issues, mental health issues, etc. They also offer a variety of courses that can help you find your way in the Dutch systems more easily. For more information see Plexus Student Centre. In addition, the International Student Network (ISN) offers all kinds of activities and services geared to the needs of international students.

25. How many hours a week will I need to devote to my study? And what testing methods are used?

The IBP programme is a full-time programme which means you need to be able to have 40 hours a week to devote to your study. IBP students will have 16 to 18 hours a week of lectures, work group sessions and tutorials. Attendance is mandatory for most of these contact hours. The remainder of the time is spent reading and doing assignments. In most of you first year course your final grade will be determined by your work group grade (30%) and your exam grade (70%). The examinations for almost all first year courses are are multiple choice examinations. In addition, your assignments will be graded.

26. Will I need to learn Dutch to study at Leiden University?

You do not have to be able to speak Dutch for IBP. If however, you want to apply for the Dutch version, you will need to speak Dutch. German students need to get to NT2 (or level 4 at our Academic Language Centre). They can follow a summer course to get to this level. Non-Dutch and non-German native speakers need to get NT3/level 6 at the language centre. See the information on courses and levels

27. Does Leiden University offer Master’s programmes?

Yes, for details please see all Master’s specialisations in Psychology

28. Can I be accepted in to a graduate programme outside of The Netherlands with this degree?

Students with bachelor degrees from Dutch universities can gain admittance to graduate programmes in other countries. The admission decision is made by the receiving school. We encourage you to plan ahead and find out what you need to do to apply at the school of your choice.

29. Is a bachelor’s degree from Leiden University recognised outside The Netherlands?

Leiden University has an excellent international reputation, and the accreditation of this programme complies with European standards. For information on how the degrees are viewed outside of the Netherlands contact the accreditation agency in the country in which you plan to work or study.

30. What are my chances of finding work as a psychologist?

Psychology is a very broad field, which means that there are many jobs in many different organisations and with a psychology degree you have the right tools to do many different kinds of jobs. On the other hand, psychology is a popular programme, so that means there are a lot of recently graduated psychologists on the market looking for a job. We do not know yet what the situation will be in three or four year’s time, but if you really want to study psychology, you should. One thing that may help you get a job after you graduate is if you combine your studies in your second and third year with a job on the side, or as a volunteer in an area that is related to psychology. Many positions in the clinical and health care areas of psychology require post master education.

After you have been selected and you have accepted and registered at Leiden University, the university’s Housing Office can assist you in finding a place to live in Leiden or The Hague if you have indicated you want student housing through the university. Although they cannot guarantee finding a place, they have several houses available and usually find a place for all international students. Again, we encourage you to apply early, so you can start your search for appropriate housing well in time. Usually the earlier you transfer your housing fee, the higher your chances of finding housing according to your preferences. Please note that university housing for IBP students is short-stay (one year) only. Should you choose to find housing on your own we suggest that you arrange this well in advance of the beginning of the academic year.